The SleepQ+ Story

The Story Behind the Invention of sleepQ+

sleepQ+ was invented by a man who couldn’t keep his mouth shut!  This is his story and the reason why he invented sleepQ+

For many years he suffered from really bad sinus pain. He had sinus surgery twice, hoping to get some relief but the pain continued, even with medication, nasal sprays and sinus rinses. He knew he breathed through his mouth during sleep because he would wake up during the night with a dry mouth. He would also wake up with sinus pain and nasal congestion. And he snored!  

He did some research, trying to understand why the problem persisted and discovered a really interesting fact: to stay healthy the sinus cavities must have constant ventilation, and they are ventilated only during nose breathing. 

Mouth breathing shuts down airflow to the sinuses causing mucus to build up, creating pressure in the sinuses. In simple terms, the sinus cavities stagnate without constant nose breathing, especially during sleep. 

This knowledge set him in search of a solution to keep his mouth closed while sleeping. 

He tried using a strap around his head and jaw but found he still breathed through his lips, even when his jaw was held tightly closed by the strap. 

Next, he tried taping his mouth closed and after a few weeks he discovered his sinus problem was improving. But releasing his taped lips was slow and difficult to remove quickly when he was sleepy. Occasionally it would dislodge and need replacing, which disrupted his sleep even more, and it hurt his skin when he removed it in the morning.

He decided taping was not for him so the answer had to be an adhesive gel. He put together a ‘Must’ list for the gel.

  • Must set within a few minutes.
  • Must have a limited grip.
  • Must release instantly when touched by the tongue.
  • Must re-engage so he could continue sleeping without applying more gel.
  • Must be safe if swallowed and not irritate sensitive lips.
  • Must be quick and easy to remove in the morning.
  • Must be made for a reasonable price.

He commissioned a pharmaceutical company to create the gel to his specificationsbut after 6 months of trials the answer came back, “we tried but it can’t be done, you want too much from one formulation”.

He wasn’t going to give up so he asked a second pharmaceutical company to continue, but after a few months they too came back with “It cannot be done, why don’t you give up?”

Even more determined, he engaged a third company. 

Over the next few months they sent him samples of gel using different ingredients, which he tested during the day and while sleeping. Sample 44 came really close to making the perfect gel, but not perfect enough for this man. 

When he told them to keep trying they said "You should have taken the advice of the first two companies, it can’t be done”. 

“But sample 39 was really close and then you removed an ingredient” he replied. “Why don’t you put that ingredient back in and see what happens?”

 “If you knew anything about chemistry you’d know that you simply don’t mix that ingredient with the new one we have added” said the chemist.

“But you’re so close” he persisted, “Here’s some more money. Go back into your lab and give it one more try. Put back the missing ingredient”. 

The next day sleepQ+ was born!

Then came safety tests, clinical trials, patents and regulatory filing, batching and tube filling trials, product branding, logo, website design, market research and extensive testing of the product on friends.

Finally, after all those years of persistence, sleepQ+ was manufactured in New Zealand and launched online from Australia in 2016. Orders started coming in from people all over the world, but mostly from the US.

Manufacturing was relocated to the United States to better serve the major markets where people need help with sleep and breathing disorders because sleepQ+ is used for more than a dozen health problems. 

In the words of the inventor of sleepQ+ “If we help everyone to sleep with a closed mouth we will have prevented some of the world’s most common sleep-related problems”.


 

 

 

 

Updated 4th November 2020