Shipping to US, Canada, UK, Germany, Australia and NZ.

Shipping to US, Canada, UK, Germany, Australia and NZ.

There's No Such Thing As 'Catching Up On Sleep.'

August 03, 2017

There's No Such Thing As 'Catching Up On Sleep.'

When the weekend rolls around, many of us can admit to staying up later and sleeping in longer than usual.

Turns out, you might want to think twice before turning into a night owl on the weekends. If you’ve got a regular sleep schedule during the workweek and you mix it up on the weekends, you may be jeopardizing your health.

A recent study by researchers at the University of Arizona found that shifting your sleep habits over the weekend could pose great risks to your health. By analyzing 984 adults, ages 22 to 60, and asking about their sleep patterns, the researchers found a link between shifting sleep patterns and heart disease, depression and other health conditions.

Using the term “social jetlag” to describe the time difference between when your body wants to sleep and when you actually go to sleep, the researchers found that it’s not only the amount of sleep that matters, but also the consistency. “These results indicate that sleep regularity, beyond sleep duration alone, plays a significant role in our health,” said Sierra Forbush, a research assistant at the University of Arizona.

So, how do you know if you’re experiencing social jetlag? For the study, researchers found the midpoint between when participants fell asleep and when they woke up -- both on weekends and weekdays -- and calculated the difference between them. So, if you typically go to sleep at 11 p.m. and wake up at 7 a.m. during the week, and at 1 a.m. and 9 a.m. over the weekend, that’s two hours of social jetlag. So, “catching up on sleep” over the weekend is, in fact, not the best idea.

"With social jetlag, you are more likely to have heart disease, to feel fatigued, to feel tired and to have a worse mood," Forbush said. The study revealed that for every hour of social jetlag weekly, a person’s likelihood of suffering from heart disease increases by a whopping 11 percent. Not only that, but participants who recorded one hour of social jetlag were 22 percent more likely to rate their health as good, but not excellent, and 28 percent were more likely to describe it as poor or fair. 

Updated August 3 2017





Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in Blog

CAN MOUTH BREATHING WORSEN INSOMNIA?
CAN MOUTH BREATHING WORSEN INSOMNIA?

May 21, 2022

Learn how mouth breathing, especially during the first 20 minutes of light sleep, can delay the onset of deeper sleep that is vital to restoring the body and mind. Conversely, nasal breathing helps to calm the mind ready for going to sleep and will not disrupt your sleep during the night. Avoiding anything that interrupts your sleep will ensure you spend more time sleeping and less time trying to get back to sleep.

 

View full article →

Why Mouth Breathing Dehydrates Your Skin?
Why Mouth Breathing Dehydrates Your Skin?

May 17, 2022

Research has indicated that there is a higher incidence of early facial ageing and skin dryness amongst mouth breathers. Learn how to control mouth breathing and improve your skin and sleep quality. 

 

View full article →

How Chronic Mouth Breathing has a detrimental impact on Child Development.
How Chronic Mouth Breathing has a detrimental impact on Child Development.

April 11, 2022

Find out how chronic mouth breathing affects children's development. From facial deformities to insomnia and ADHD, learn how mouth breathing needs to be recognised early in childhood to avoid lasting and detrimental effects.

View full article →