Shipping to US, Canada, UK, Germany, Australia and NZ.

Shipping to US, Canada, UK, Germany, Australia and NZ.

How Much Sleep Does Our Brain Need?

July 10, 2017

How Much Sleep Does Our Brain Need?

RECOMMENDATIONS FROM THE NATIONAL SLEEP FOUNDATION

Sleep protects our physical and mental health and insufficient sleep is the cause of some serious health problems including strokes, high blood pressure, overweight and obesity, diabetes, dementia and occular problems.

The amount of sleep that a person needs to stay healthy, alert and active depends on their age and will vary from one person to another, but there are now some recognized guidelines.

The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) evaluated 300 studies and recently released an age-based sleep recommendation scale. 

Newborns (0 to 3 months): 14 to 17 hours of sleep

Infants (4 to 11 months): 12 to 15 hours of sleep

Toddlers (1 to 2 years): 11 to 14 hours of sleep

Preschoolers (3 to 5 years): 10 to 13 hours of sleep

School-agers (6 to 13): 9 to 11 hours of sleep

Teenagers (14 to 17 years): 8 to 10 hours of sleep

Young adults (18 to 25 years): 7 to 9 hours of sleep

Adults (26 to 64 years): 7 to 9 hours of sleep

Older adults (65 years +): 7 to 8 hours of sleep

Gender Differences.

Women often sleep more than men and their sleep is lighter and more easily disrupted. Pregnancy and hormonal changes related to menopause influence sleep health. Traditionally, tending to babies and children was “the woman’s job” but today the modern man shares those nocturnal duties.

Other Factors that Disrupt Sleep

Depression, stress, arthritis, fibromyalgia, muscle pain, epilepsy, heart disease and substance abuse. Restless Leg Syndrome is another sleep disrupter.

Updated July 10th 2017





Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in Blog

CAN MOUTH BREATHING WORSEN INSOMNIA?
CAN MOUTH BREATHING WORSEN INSOMNIA?

May 21, 2022

Learn how mouth breathing, especially during the first 20 minutes of light sleep, can delay the onset of deeper sleep that is vital to restoring the body and mind. Conversely, nasal breathing helps to calm the mind ready for going to sleep and will not disrupt your sleep during the night. Avoiding anything that interrupts your sleep will ensure you spend more time sleeping and less time trying to get back to sleep.

 

View full article →

Why Mouth Breathing Dehydrates Your Skin?
Why Mouth Breathing Dehydrates Your Skin?

May 17, 2022

Research has indicated that there is a higher incidence of early facial ageing and skin dryness amongst mouth breathers. Learn how to control mouth breathing and improve your skin and sleep quality. 

 

View full article →

How Chronic Mouth Breathing has a detrimental impact on Child Development.
How Chronic Mouth Breathing has a detrimental impact on Child Development.

April 11, 2022

Find out how chronic mouth breathing affects children's development. From facial deformities to insomnia and ADHD, learn how mouth breathing needs to be recognised early in childhood to avoid lasting and detrimental effects.

View full article →