4.2 Percent Of Drivers Admit To Sleeping Behind The Wheel

July 03, 2017

4.2 Percent Of Drivers Admit To Sleeping Behind The Wheel

A study of U.S. adults in 19 states and the District of Columbia revealed that 4.2 percent of drivers fell asleep behind the wheel within the previous month before being surveyed, the Centers for Disease Control Prevention reported Thursday.

The revealing report showed the dangers of not getting enough sleep and operating a vehicle. People who said they snored or slept less than six hours a day were more likely to report sleeping while driving.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) said that 2.5 percent of all fatal motor crashes and 2.0 percent of all non-fatal crashes involved drowsy driving, according to the authors.

The AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety estimates that more than 16 percent of fatal crashes involve a drowsy driver.

However, the percentage could be as high as 33 percent since data collection can be difficult.

The CDC surveyed 147,076 people 18 and older in Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New York, Oregon, Texas and Wyoming in 2009 and/or 2010 using the agency’s ongoing Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS).

Survey takers were asked whether they had fallen asleep while driving — otherwise known as drowsy driving — in the last 30 days, how often they dozed off during the day, how rested they felt and about their regular sleeping habits.

Men were more likely to sleep while driving than women (5.3 percent versus 3.2 percent), while younger drivers were more likely to doze off then older ones (more than 4.9 percent of the 18-44 year old group compared to 1.7 percent of the 65 and older group).

Non-Hispanic whites were less likely to admit to driving while drowsy (3.2 percent versus 6.1 percent of non-Hispanic blacks, 5.9 percent of Hispanics and 6.0 percent of all other races/ethnicities).

Kent Smith DDS, D-ABDSM President at American Sleep And Breathing Academy

Updated July 17th 2017





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